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copyright law Archives

Comic book cover draws ire of California-based publisher

California-based DC Comics has been publishing comic books and graphic novels featuring the character Wonder Woman for over 70 years. In the interest of protecting its intellectual property, the company has issued a cease-and-desist order against a New York-based bookstore that commissioned comic book cover art that depicts one of the state's congresswomen in the role. The order also applies to the rival comic book company that published comics featuring the controversial cover art. 

Fan fiction often violates copyrights

Writing fan fiction is a popular hobby in California and most other areas of the country. While many writers create fan stories for personal enjoyment, there are others who choose to publish their work online. Some even attempt to charge money for their stories. What many people may not realize is that most fan fiction violates copyright protections, even if it is not sold for profit.

Copyrights prevent some Netflix customers from streaming

For years, Netflix has built up its reputation as a purveyor of streaming entertainment. While most of its customers in California and around the country consume its content online, Netflix still has ties to its roots as a DVD-by-mail company, and some 2.7 million customers around the country still consume its media that way to this day. 

What is a work made for hire?

Ordinarily, if you create an original work of authorship in California and fix it in a tangible medium of expression, you automatically hold the copyright to it. That copyright is yours unless you transfer it to someone else. Otherwise, even when you die, your estate will retain the ownership of it for many years thereafter. However, there is one notable exception to this rule. If someone hires you to create a work of authorship for business purposes, it may be a work for hire, which means that the entity for whom you created the work holds the copyright, not you. 

Understanding the “fair use” doctrine

As a California resident who has the rights to a certain copyrighted work, you may have obtained the copyright in an attempt to prevent others from using your work without your explicit permission. If someone does decide to reference or otherwise use your copyrighted work without first securing permission, whether he or she is behaving unlawfully in doing so depends on whether the action constituted “fair use.” At Peterson Watts Law Group, LLP, we understand that the fair use doctrine allows people to reference your work in limited circumstances, and we have helped many people determine whether someone’s use of their copyrighted work fell within these fair use parameters.

Why you need to register your copyright

At Peterson Watts Law Group, LLP, in California, we represent many creative people whose mission in life is to create works of art such as paintings, musical compositions, books, photographs, computer programs, or any number of other artistic work types. These works represent the intellectual property of their respective creators, and as such, need to be copyright protected from the infringement of and by others.

Independent artists struggle to protect copyrights

Intellectual property is not something that is important only to large corporations. There are many small businesses and even individuals in California and elsewhere who hold copyrights or other forms of intellectual property for their creations and work. These people and entities may sometimes feel they have a limited ability to actually benefit from these protections, however.

Software copyright dispute leads to Supreme Court petition

Copyright disputes in California can be difficult to resolve. There are often legitimate questions as to who originated a particular work, whether a work is derivative, whether the information is so basic that copyright does not apply or whether the use of copyrighted material was fair. As digital technologies are still emerging and evolving, the courts sometimes seem to have trouble keeping up with how existing intellectual property laws apply to their continuing development. 

Musician's appeal to drop copyright lawsuit denied

The music industry is certainly that built on highly creative works and endeavors. That creative nature, however, does not negate the fact that it is still a business and one that many people in California make their living from. Any companies that are involved in the music industry or that rely on protections from copyrights might understandably keep a close eye on prominent litigation in this arena.

What does and does not a copyright protect?

A copyright is a form of protection that safeguards original works of authorship including dramatic, literary, artistic and musical works. Such works may include but are not limited to novels, poetry, songs, movies, architecture and computer software. A copyright does not protect ideas, facts, systems or methods of operation, though it may protect the way in which one expresses these things. If you wish to obtain a copyright in California, it is important that you first understand what copyright does and does not protect. Copyright.gov explains protections in detail.

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Roseville, CA 95661

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